VOC Moons (What’s up with all that?): Why shouldn’t you start something new during a VOC Moon? I’m thinking it’s as simply as this: Because you won’t be putting enough “energy” into it.

I generally feel incredibly lazy, for a normally highly productive state, during VOC’s. I simply don’t want to do ANYTHING but vegetate. Try as I might to do otherwise. Especially during a Waxing VOC Moon…

Energy is matter. Matter is money. Money matters. Energy matters. Energy is matter. Matter is manifestation. Manifesting matters. Energy matters. Energy is matter. Energy is matter. Matter is a corporeal being. A human being matters. Energy matters. Energy is matter.

The VOC Moon is unaspected, and therefore is receiving NO energy, impetus, or sparks of initiation.

If you don’t put “energy” into anything, you can’t really get anything out of it, which is likely why astrologers refer to Lily as suggesting that,
“Nothing will come of this,” during a VOC Moon.
Mystery (for myself) solved.
Nothing to be superstitious about.

However, I will say this: I still firmly believe in — whatever is supposed to happen, happens. Right now, is right for now. Nothing is ever a waste of time. etc…

So if you do do anything during a VOC, it was meant to happen. See how your story plays out, and work with it darlings.

~ Abella Arthur

After I wrote this, I went looking for support of what I’m saying and ran into this…

http://www.astrologyweekly.com/forum/archive/index.php/t-8909.html

Looking to Jupiter
03-27-2008, 10:31 PM

The reason why I have been so keen to actually find Lilly’s wording in the book, is because it was brought to my attention yesterday, by a very reputable astrologer, that he doesnt actually say that nothing will come of the matter.

Lilly states
“All manner of matters goe hardly on (except the principall significators be very strong) when the moon is void of course; yet somewhat she performs if void of course, and be either in Taurus, Cancer, Sagittarius or Pisces.”

Now personally, I think this reputable astrologer is totally right. It says nothing of the sort that the void of course moon, means nothing will come of the matter.

The first thing I think of when reading this Old English, is the phrase, “To be hardly done by”. Meaning in fact, to have had a hard time with something. Like this astrologer mentioned to me by email yesterday, (I’m not sure I can say who this astrologer was, as they dont know I am writing this:confused:), I think it is actually saying in Lilly’s text that, that the void of course moon, will actually make the situation queried about, hard. Are we infact, by saying that nothing will come of the matter, making decisions for the querent? It may be, that some folk will decide to not go ahead with doing something because of the struggle they may have with the matter, but I dont think it is our decision.

I wanted to find out more about the wording of this term “goe hardly”, because I think now a days, we are have read the term “hardly”, to mean “barely”, which I have found to be wrong.

I refer you to something I found on line at “Answers.com” ( I need to go and check this information again from another source), but I think we have a significant problem here.

Middle English hardli, from Old English heardlīce, harshly, bravely, from heard, hard. See hard (http://www.answers.com/topic/hard).]USAGE NOTE In Standard English, hardly, scarcely, and similar adverbs cannot be used with a negative. The sentence I couldn’t hardly see him, for instance, is not acceptable. This violation of the double negative rule is curious because these adverbs are not truly negative in meaning. The sentence Mary hardly laughed means that Mary did laugh a little, not that she kept from laughing altogether, and therefore does not express a negative proposition. But adverbs like hardly and scarcely do share some important features of negative adverbs, even though they may not have purely negative meaning. For one thing, they combine with any and at all, which are characteristically associated with negative contexts. Thus we say I hardly saw him at all or I never saw him at all but not I occasionally saw him at all. Similiarly, we say I hardly had any time or I didn’t have any time but not I had any time and so on. Like other negative adverbs, hardly triggers inversion of the subject and auxiliary verb when it begins a sentence. Thus we say Hardly had I arrived when she left on the pattern of Never have I read such a book or At no time has he condemned the movement. Other adverbs do not cause this kind of inversion. We would not say Occasionally has he addressed this question or To a slight degree have they changed their position. The fact is that adverbs such as hardly can be said to have a negative meaning in that they minimize the state or event they describe. Thus hardly means “almost not at all”; rarely means “practically never”; and so forth. This is why they cannot be used with another negative such as not or none. See Usage Notes at double negative, rarely, scarcely.

Now as you can see, modern usage of the word hardly, refers to rarely, scarcely. But if you note, in old english terminology, the term actually means harshly, bravely. Which actually brings the modern translation of Lilly, that nothing will come of the matter, to being a total fabrication.

hardly

• adverb 1 scarcely; barely. 2 only with great difficulty. 3 no or not (suggesting surprise at or disagreement with a statement).

Please note, the second meaning of the word “only with great difficulty”.
I think it is presumptious of us, to assume that the term only means, that nothing will come of the matter, when this meaning also exists. We are not doing querents a service, in telling them that nothing will come of the matter, when in fact we should be telling them things could happen with great difficulty

 

archergirl
03-29-2008, 03:42 AM
The way Deb Houlding explained it to me was, besides the Ivy Goldstein-Jacobson “nothing will come of the matter” context, that the void of course moon describes a ‘lapse of energy’, wherein nothing can move forward because there is not strength or power available to move it; much like the wind suddenly going out of a boat’s sails. When the Moon leaves VOC, the wind suddenly puffs the sails out again. (This is how I view it in my mind, at least.)Cheers,
AG

 

http://www.astrologyweekly.com/forum/archive/index.php/t-8909.html

On a public post on Facebook, Tamara Innerpowerastro explains it like this:

Abella, here is my analogy about driving a car (or train) for the Void moon: When the moon is making aspects you are driving with direction, and possibly speed. You know where you are going and you heading there; you’re more focused, less distracted.
When it goes void, its like your car has slipped into neutral, you can’t make turns and you’re certainly not driving with direction anymore. Maybe you enter another lane unexpectedly and end up in another city. Hopefully you don’t drive off the traintracks! or off the road into a ditch! lol

Anyway, if you accumulated enough speed and directional focus while the moon was NOT void, you could theoretically continue “coasting” into the void moon phase, at least in the beginning of it.
But if you START a project while the moon is in Void phase, you will likely start the ignition while in a ditch or off the road and it will be very difficult to get back on the road and out of “neutral”.

I usually post the Void moon phases on my fanpage & twitter for those who follow it, and I encourage readers to work/accomplish according to this schedule. I certainly do. And there seem to be a lot of “voids” over the next week in the EST time zone.

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