Thinking about language again…

Advocates of this school of thought point out that words are cheap. As digital hallucinations, they are intrinsically unreliable. Should an especially clever ape, or even a group of articulate apes, try to use words in the wild, they would carry no conviction. The primate vocalizations that do carry conviction — those they actually use — are unlike words, in that they are emotionally expressive, intrinsically meaningful and reliable because they are relatively costly and hard to fake. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origin_of_language#Ritual.2Fspeech_coevolution

After watching Frequencies / OXV: The Manual (a philosophy / outlook I believe in and talk a lot about in small dosages… it’s along the thinking style shared in my article: The Prison Planet), I thought about what makes one person’s speech resonate on a higher level than anothers.

I think different words, have a different vibrations and therefore a different impact and response to them, once heard or read. I also believe that words are magical, and are supposed to be used for magic making (incantations / spells); however, eventually language got into the hands of the world’s people but they had to be taught to not make much use of it. This is why a lot of people don’t have much to say, nothing original, meaningful, etc…Most of us have been dumbed down (Tower of Babylon) to avoid provoking a meaningful spell on the world’s people. We’re in language lock-down.

I thought of writing out the same idea with different words. I mean, there can be 100+ words that mean the same thing but have a different impact. So which of the following sentences (that essentially mean the same thing) have a higher or lower frequency? And I use the word frequency within the context of physics or astronomy — how you “feel”, and after hearing or reading something.

Which sentence leaves a lasting impression, or quickest and most forceful impact of meaning? This illustrates higher and lower frequency in speech, and therefore in how you interact with another human being.

I fancy wellness.
I like happiness.
I enjoy eudaemonia.
I appreciate comfort.
I espouse strength.

What we say, and how we string our words together — matters. Not so much the words in and of themselves but the sound vibration and level of frequency. And this is why self-talk, and CBT (Cognitive Behavior Therapy) affects us greatly. When we speak, it matters.

While I use English words, consider the sounds of other languages. French is known as the romantic language, and I find Egyptian Arabic to have a soothing sound to it, when spoken by women. What I’m saying here is that the sound or look of the word can mean more than the words.

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